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The United States TSCA issued a restriction on the use of five PBT toxic substances
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Time:2021-03-22
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Bt toxicity is Persistent, bio-accumulative and Toxic abbreviation, that is, persistence, biological accumulation and toxicity.


Section 6 of the TSCA Toxic Substances Management Act is designed to regulate chemical substances or mixtures to the extent necessary when they are manufactured, processed, distributed, used, or disposed of in a manner that poses an unreasonable risk of harm to human health or environmental safety.



Section (h) is mainly for the management requirements of toxic substances with PBT.


In December 2020, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued five regulations for toxic substances known as PBT. The effect of this law should be taken into account when exporting consumer goods such as textiles and electrical appliances to the United States.


Pursuant to the requirements of Section 6(h) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), EPA issued five final rules on January 6, 2021 to reduce exposure to certain persistent, biocumulative, and toxic chemicals (PBT).


The five final rules set limits on the following substances:


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These chemicals accumulate in the environment over time and can therefore pose a potential risk to the people they are exposed to. The above rules take effect on February 5, 2021, and will take effect in stages on March 8.


1. Name of substance: decabromodiphenyl ether (Decabde)


Use and identified hazards:


Decabromodiphenyl ether is used as an additive flame retardant in the plastic housing of wires and cables for television, computer, audio and video equipment, textile and upholstery items, communications and electronic equipment and other applications. Decabromodibenzyl ethers are also used as flame retardants in a variety of aerospace and motor vehicle applications, including replacement parts for aircraft and automobiles.


Determined Hazard - Decabromodiphenyl ether is toxic to aquatic invertebrates, fish and terrestrial invertebrates. Data suggest potential developmental, neurological, and immunological effects, general developmental toxicity, hepatic effects, and carcinogenicity. Although the use of decabrodiphenyl ether has been discontinued for many uses, EPA has concluded that humans or the environment may be exposed to decabrodiphenyl ether under the use conditions defined in the final rule.


Risk Management Measures:


EPA prohibits the manufacture (including import), processing, and distribution of decabromodiphenyl ethers and products containing decabromodiphenyl ethers for commercial purposes, except for the following:


1. For the commercial production, processing and distribution of curtains for employment and for the distribution of curtains themselves for a period of 18 months, after which the ban comes into force;


2. The commercial processing and distribution of the insulation of wires and cables used in nuclear power generation facilities and the distribution of the insulation of wires and cables containing decabromodiphenyl ether for a period of two years, after which the ban will come into force;


3. The commercial manufacture, processing and distribution of products for use in new aerospace and spacecraft parts, and the commercial distribution of new vehicles containing such parts, for a period of three years, after which the ban will come into force;


4. The commercial manufacture, processing and distribution of aerospace spacecraft manufactured using parts containing decabromodiphenyl ether will be prohibited until the end of their service life; Manufacture, process and sell replacement parts for aerospace and spacecraft for commercial purposes; And the commercial sale of the replacement parts themselves;


5. Manufacturing, processing and distribution for commercial purposes for the use of replacement parts in motor vehicles and the commercial sale of replacement parts themselves until the end of the service life of the motor vehicles or 2036, whichever is earlier;


6. Commercial sale of plastic transport pallets containing decabromodiphenyl ether manufactured prior to the issuance of the Final Rules until the end of the service life of the pallets;


7. Commercial use of the processing and distribution to before the recycled plastics recycling contains ten pbdes plastic (i.e., recycled plastic from the original made of ten pbdes items and products), and the recycling plastic items and products for a long time because in the process of recycling or production will not add new ten pbdes.


2. Substance name: isopropylated triphenyl phosphate (PIP (3:1))


Use and identified hazards:


PIP (3:1) is used as a plasticizer, flame retardant, anti-wear additive or anti-compression additive in hydraulic oils, lubricants, lubricants and greases, various industrial coatings, adhesives, sealants and plastic products. As a chemical that can perform multiple functions simultaneously under extreme conditions, it has a variety of unique applications.


Determine Hazards -- PIP (3:1) Toxic to aquatic plants, aquatic invertebrates, sediment invertebrates, and fish. The data suggest potential reproductive and developmental effects, neurological effects and effects on organs throughout the body, particularly the adrenal glands, liver, ovaries, heart and lungs.


Risk Management Measures:


EPA prohibits the processing and sale of PIP (3:1) and products containing chemical substances for commercial use, except for:


1. Processing and distribution of commercial hydraulic oils for aviation hydraulic systems and special hydraulic oils for military applications;


2. Used commercially for the processing and distribution of lubricants and lipids;


3. Commercial processing and distribution of new and replacement parts for the aerospace and automotive industries;


4. Commercial processing and distribution as intermediates for the manufacture of cyanoacrylate gels;


5. Processing and distribution for commercial use of special engine air filters for locomotive and Marine applications;


6. Commercial processing and distribution of sealants and adhesives;


Commercial processing and distribution, with before plastic recycling to contain PIP (3:1) plastic recycling (that is, to use recycled plastic from the original PIP items and products made of (3:1), and the items and products made from this kind of recycled plastics, as long as in the process of recycling or production don't add new PIP (3:1).


EPA requires those who manufacture, process, and distribute PIP (3:1) in a business and products containing PIP (3:1) to inform their customers of these limitations.


EPA also prohibits the release of effluent from the remaining manufacturing, processing, and sale processes in commercial activities, and requires commercial users to use PIP (3:1) and products containing PIP (3:1) to comply with current regulations and best practices to prevent release into water during use.


3. Substance name: 2,4, 6-tri (tert-butyl) phenol (2,4,6-TTBP)


Use and identified hazards:


2,4,6-TTBP is used as an intermediate/reactant during processing and incorporated into formulations for fuels and fuel-related additives and for the maintenance or repair of motor vehicles and machinery, including oil neutralizing lubricants.


Identified Hazard -- 2,4,6-TTBP Toxic to aquatic plants, aquatic invertebrates and fish. Animal data from the investigation suggest potential hepatic and developmental effects. The studies presented in this document demonstrate these dangerous endpoints. The EPA concluded that exposure to 2,4,6-TTBP is possible under service conditions.


Risk Management Measures:


EPA prohibits the sale of 2,4,6-TTBP and products containing 2,4,6-TTBP in concentrations greater than 0.3% by weight in any container less than 35 gallons to effectively prevent the use of 2,4,6-TTBP as a fuel additive or noZZLE cleaner purchased by consumers and small commercial organizations (such as auto repair shops and ports).


EPA also prohibits the commercial processing and sale of 2,4,6-TTBP and products containing 2,4,6-TTBP in concentrations greater than 0.3% (by weight) for use as oil or lubricant additives, regardless of container size.


4. Substance name: PCTP


Use and identified hazards:


PCTP, also known as PCTP, is used to make rubber softer for industrial uses.


Identified hazards - PCTP is toxic to protozoa, fish, land plants, and birds. Data on similar chemicals (pentachloronitrobenzene and hexachlorobenzene) suggest potential liver and reproductive effects. However, no animal or human hazard data have been established.


Risk Management Measures:


The EPA prohibits the manufacture (including import), processing, and commercial sale of PCTP and products or articles containing PCTP, unless the concentration of PCTP does not exceed 1% by weight.


5. Substent name: HCBD


Use and identified hazards:


Hexachlorobutadiene is used as a halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbon and is produced as a by-product in the manufacture of chlorinated hydrocarbons (in particular perchloroethylene, trichloroethylene and carbon tetrachloride) and then burned as spent fuel.


Identified hazards - HCPD is toxic to aquatic invertebrates, fish and birds, and has been identified as a possible human carcinogen. The data suggest potential renal, reproductive and developmental effects.


Risk Management Measures:


EPA prohibits the manufacture (including import), processing, and commercial sale of hachlorobutadiene and products or articles containing hachlorobutadiene, except that it is not intended to produce hachlorobutadiene as a by-product during the production of chlorinated solvents and the commercial processing and sale of hachlorobutadiene burned as spent fuel.